Regina Jose Galindo | the artist




The artist Regina Jose Galindo
Born 1974, Ciudad de Guatemala, Guatemala.
Lives and works in Guatemala.

Style and technique of the artist: Performance Art, Video, Venice Biennale, Sydney Biennale,


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Original artworks, prints, exhibition posters, monographs, books, collectibles.

Galindo’s bleak performances consistently depict self-initiated violence against her body.  Through her work Galindo directly responds to the struggle of life in Guatemala under repeatedly corrupt regimes.  She boldly holds up political crimes, social hierarchies, segregation and the oppression of women for examination…
"My body not like an individual body, but as a social body, a collective body, a global body. To be or to reflect through me, her, his, their experience because all of us, we are at the same time ourselves and the others…"
The surgeon points out my defects and the changes I would have to make in order to be "beautiful." In Venezuela, in particular, there is an obsessive cult of beauty.
“I suppose that—like everything I do—this was done for me.” The complexity implied by that simple statement pulses throughout her art, whether she is walling herself inside a cinderblock cell; lying naked and pregnant on a bed, bound hand and foot by umbilical cords; blasting away on a firing range with a semiautomatic handgun; or allowing a plastic surgeon to demarcate all the “imperfections” of her body, an exercise that leaves her looking like an animated Cubist drawing. The absurdity and wit of many of her actions do not so much leaven the more harrowing aspect of her work as add to its pathos—a tragicomic mood swing that brings to mind Lear’s dying lament, “And my poor fool is hang’d”—an outburst that could refer to his daughter Cordelia, whose body he bears as a symbol of slaughtered innocence, or to his sardonic, truth-telling Fool: two roles that Galindo has taken upon herself, voluntarily or not, wittingly or not, as she navigates the horrific muddle we’ve made of life on Earth.
Galindo’s actions in “Who can erase the traces?” became immediately famous within the public as representation of individual resistance and a collective portrayal of a civil, untrusting society. In this work, a young woman dressed in black makes her way across Guatemala City—from the Constitutional Court to the National Palace—with her feet covered in blood, fulfilling a silent and difficult act, condemning against the possible presidential election of former dictator Rios Montt. But ever since her first action in 1999, Galindo was already congregating the space of her own body with society’s body, when—still unheard—she would chant her poetry while being suspended 10 meters above ground in an urban plaza in Guatemala City…


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