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Maja Bajevic | the artist



The artist Maja Bajevic
Born April 20 1967, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

Style and technique of the artist: Installation art, Documenta Kassel,

Graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts Sarajevo, Graphic Design department. Graduated and finished post-graduated studies at the ENSBA (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts de Paris) , France- the Multimedia department with congratulations of the jury.


Biography and art, auction, artworks, interview, statement, website:

Maja Bajevic artworks on eBay
Original artworks, prints, exhibition posters, monographs, books, collectibles.

Maja Bajevic’s work directly comments on prominent issues in recent history such as collective identity, tragedy, destiny, the construction and deconstruction of history, ideology, and sociology. Acting as a catalyst, her work creates narratives that reference memory and identity, reflecting on the past and present of local socio-political events that possess global implications and referencing a collective destiny and the fragments of a shattered history. Soliciting the observer’s attention in order to understand her subtle language, Bajevic’s works range from video, to light and sound installations, to performance…

"Green Green Grass of Home"

Assises sur les passerelles d’un √©chafaudage, des femmes brodent des motifs traditionnels bosniaques sur le filet de protection qui recouvre cette structure. (with online video)

Maja Bajevic’s multi-faceted body of work has often addressed the permeability of the boundary between what is public and what is private. In her early projects the driving force behind her performances and installations was often conflict (specifically war) and its impact on people’s lives. With I Wish I Was Born in a Hollywood Movie, her first web-based artwork, she shifts her focus from politics to a broader cultural force, the Hollywood “dream machine.” Wishing to explore its influence, specifically the personal, internal conflict created by the disparity between the idealized and glamorized representations of life found in popular movies and the stark realities of everyday life, she wrote, “When reality gets confronted with that ideal picture it can only lose.”