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The Düsseldorf School of Photography
The German photographic movement commonly known as the Dusseldorf School of Photography has become synonymous with artistic excellence and innovation. It began in the mid-1970s at the Kunstakademie Dusseldorf, under the instruction of the photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher, known for their comparative grids of mundane industrial buildings captured with an objective and clinical eye. This school has not only birthed some of today’s most important and successful photographers, but has also had a fundamental and lasting influence on the history of the medium. Buy the book at amazon.com.

Bernd and Hilla Becher, Laurenz Berges, Elger Esser, Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Axel Hutte, Simone Nieweg, Thomas Ruff, Jorg Sasse, Thomas Struth and Petra Wunderlich

Hundreds of artist photographers are listed here with their biography and works.

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Andreas Gursky
A Japanese power plant, dilapidated slums, the patterned facades of an apartment complex in Paris–in the work of German art photographer Andreas Gursky, born in 1955 in Leipzig, both private dwellings and the domains of industrial and political power are made into sometimes awe-inspiring and always overpowering forces of urban life…

Andreras Gursky biography and resources.

Thomas Ruff
Thomas Ruff is one of the best-known and most influential German photographers working today. Ever since the early 1980s, he has investigated the photographic medium, the use that is made of it, and the world of contemporary visual culture in general. This volume brings together and comments upon a selection of over eighty-four photographic works on the most diverse subjects: house interiors, portraits, architecture, starry skies, and nocturnal urban views…

Thomas Ruff biography and resources.

Bernd and Hilla Becher: Life and Work
Bernd and Hilla Becher’s lifetime project of documenting the industrial landscape of our time secures their position in the canon of postwar photographers. With 53 duotone plates and more than 200 additional illustrations, is the first book to delve deeply into the sources and vision behind the evocative and melancholy beauty of the Bechers’ work. It will be indispensable both as a reference for students of postwar German photography and as a guide for readers who want to know how to approach the Bechers’ monumental project.

Bernd and Hella Becher biography and resources.

Candida Hofer: Architecture of Absence
Candida Höfer creates meticulously composed images of public and institutional spaces marked with the richness of human activity, yet largely devoid of human presence. Whether a photograph of a national library or a lounge at Volkswagen’s headquarters, Höfer’s images ask us to conduct distanced, disengaged examinations through the windows she creates…

Candida Hofer biography and resources.

Thomas Struth
Photographer Thomas Struth is one of the most acclaimed artists to emerge from Europe in the late twentieth century. With great precision, clarity of color, and an unwavering instinct for composition, he addresses both important photographic motifs and informal, often little-known subjects. Struth characteristically treats the various aspects of his photographs in an even-handed way, a neutrality he also applies to the viewer, for he puts the viewing public on a par with his pictorial world…

Thomas Struth biography and resources.


Robert Capa: The Definitive Collection
Robert Capa (1913–1954), one of the greatest photographers of the twentieth century and a founding member of the Magnum photographic agency, had the mind of a passionate and committed journalist and the eye of an artist. His lifework, consisting of more than 70,000 negative frames, constitutes an unparalleled documentation of a crucial twenty-two-year period (1932–1954) encompassing some of the most catastrophic and dramatic events of the last century…

Robert Capa biography and resources.

Rineke Dijkstra
Tall, skinny, short, round, squat, awkward, slouched, tanned, bashful, and sometimes unknowingly beautiful, the adolescents in Rineke Dijkstra’s Beach Portraits stand alone, the ocean rolling behind them. Clad in little more than bathing suits, these young people are striking to behold. Remarkably clear and formally classical, each subject is frontally posed and shot straight on; the resulting photographs participate in a cold, quasi-scientific categorization reminiscent of the work of August Sander and Thomas Ruff. Yet Dijkstra’s pictures are not just that–there is also something of the eccentric in them, something that comes closer to Diane Arbus’s images. Seen together, the complete series of 20 Beach Portraits creates a kind of collective portrait of the existential insecurity and awkward beauty of youth.

Rineke Dijkstra biography and resources.

Robert Doisneau
A previously unpublished collection of Robert Doisneau’s color photography provides a unique opportunity to revisit the early years of one of America’s legendary holiday destinations. In 1960, Robert Doisneau was invited by Fortune magazine to cover Palm Springs, the hottest travel destination of the day. Renowned as a playground for the rich and famous, as well as for a silver-haired and well-heeled clientele, it was a world of swimming pools awash with bobbing beehives, martini-fueled parties, and relaxed games of golf, all unfolding against a desert backdrop…

Robert Doisneau biography and resources.

Walker Evans
Walker Evans’s career spread over 46 fitful and prolific years, yet in a scant two, 1935-1936, he produced the singular body of work that came to define him. During that brief time, while working for the Farm Security Administration (previously the U.S. Resettlement Administration) photographing the consequences of the Great Depression, he refined a hybrid style that combined documentation with sly personal comment. He delighted in traveling incognito as an artless photojournalist, but with the independence to satisfy his own artistic designs…

Walker Evans biography and resources.

Annie Leibovitz
“The first thing I did with my very first camera was climb Mt. Fuji. Climbing Mt. Fuji is a lesson in determination and moderation. It would be fair to ask if I took the moderation part to heart. But it certainly was a lesson in respecting your camera. If I was going to live with this thing, I was going to have to think about what that meant. There were not going to be any pictures without it.”

Annie Leibovitz biography and resources.

Boris Mikhailov
Rarely has anyone photographed reality in such an unprettified way as Boris Mikhailov. He captures the unadorned and the natural; in pictures devoid of aesthetic exhaltation, he concentrates on people and their living conditions. On his journeys through Russia, Germany, and his Ukrainian homeland, Mikhailov has equally observed the poor, the well-to-do, the outcasts, and the homeless…

Boris Mikhailov biography and resources.

Helmut Newton
White Women was and still is the legendary first book by Helmut Newton, published in 1976. His inimitable blend of aestheticism, technical perfection and luxurious upper-middle-class decadence is today just as appealing and controversial as it was thirtythree years ago. White Women is a delicacy in visual erotic literature that connoisseurs and people in the know still consider to be Newton s best book ever.

Helmut Newton biography and resources.

Sebastião Salgado
More than those of any other living photographer, Sebastião Salgado’s images of the world’s poor stand in tribute to the human condition. His transforming photographs bestow dignity on the most isolated and neglected, from famine-stricken refugees in the Sahel to the indigenous peoples of South America. Workers is a global epic that transcends mere imagery to become an affirmation of the enduring spirit of working women and men.

Sebastiao Salgado biography and resources.

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