German Expressionism

German Expressionism Documents of Art
Blaue Reiter, German expressionist art movement, lasting from 1911 to 1914. It took its name from a painting by Kandinsky, Le cavalier bleu. Following the Brücke artists of the previous decade, this second wave of expressionism was led by Kandinsky, Klee, Marc, and Macke, in Munich. They sought to discover spiritual truths that they felt the impressionists had overlooked. Less united stylistically and as a group than the Brücke, their art ranged from the pure abstractions of Kandinsky to the romantic imagery of Marc. All Blaue Reiter artists here.
Die Brucke, group of German expressionist artists, founded in Dresden in 1905, whose work marked the beginning of modern art in Germany. The principal members were the architectural student Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, in whose studio they regularly gathered, and his friends Erich Heckel, Fritz Bleyl, Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, and, later, Emil Nolde and Max Pechstein. All Die Brucke artists here.

German Expressionism

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Blaue Reiter Almanac


"We went with a divining rod through the art of the past and present. We showed only that art which lives untouched by the constraint of convention. Our devoted love was extended to all artistic expression which is born out of itself, lives on its own merit, and does not walk with the crutches of custom. Wherever we have seen a crevice in the crust of convention, we have called attention to it, because we have hoped for a force underneath, which will someday come to light" - Franz Marc"

Kandinsky: Complete Writings On Art

Though his art was marked by extraordinarily varied styles, Kandinsky sought a pure art throughout, one which would express the soul, or “inner necessity,” of the artist. His uncompromising search for an art which would elicit a response to itself rather than to the object depicted resulted in the birth of nonobjective art—and in these writings, Kandinsky offered the first cogent explanation of his aims…

Kandinsky



Nearly 100 paintings brings together works from the three institutions that have the greatest concentration of Kandinsky’s work in the world: the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; and Stadtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich; as well as significant loans from private and public holdings…





Max Beckmann

Max Beckmann was among the greatest painters of the 20th century, yet no retrospective of his work has been mounted in the art capitals of New York, London, and Paris in over 30 years. Perhaps the lapse of attention has to do with the importance of abstraction in 20th-century art, and Beckmann’s work is always figurative, simultaneously muscular and enigmatic and has enormous and unsettling power…

Alexej Von Jawlensky

This book features 632 paintings, covering the period up to the artist’s enforced departure from Germany at the outbreak of World War 1. The landscapes, portraits and still-lives of this phase display a brilliant, highly developed use of color.

Paul Klee

As an avant-garde artist of the twentieth century, painter Paul Klee’s work defies classification. What is indisputable, however, is its originality and brilliance. Taken from the artist’s most prolific years,1917-1933, this book presents works that Klee never intended to sell. More than 100 color plates reveal Klee’s chromatic genius and wide stylistic range…

Franz Marc



A casualty of World War I, Franz Marc was a pioneer of German Expressionism and co-founder with Wassily Kandinsky of the Blue Rider, which was both a publication and coalition of artists. His most famous images are paintings of blue horses, which are meant to convey the spiritual essence of nature lost to modern man and a personal symbolism of color…

Expressionism: A Revolution in German Art



In six chapters—The Brücke Group of Artists, Northern German Expressionism, The Blaue Reiter, Rhenish Expressionism, The City and Expressionism in Vienna—this publication deals with a specifically German artistic revolution, a phenomenon that has quite accurately been described as “the most significant German contribution to 20th century European art.”
Beside a number of famous names, including Beckmann, Heckel, Kandinsky, Kirchner, Kokoschka, Macke, Marc, Mueller, Nolde, Schiele, and Schmidt-Rottluff, the author also introduces several lesser-known artists, such as Campendonk, Felixmüller, Meidner, Morgner, Münter, and von Werefkin.

Expressionism



Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Emil Nolde, E. L. Kirchner, Paul Klee, Franz Marc as well as the Austrians Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele were among the generation of highly individual artists who contributed to the vivid and often controversial new movement in early twentieth-century Germany and Austria: Expressionism. This publication introduces their work and places it within the cultural contexts and wider movements of the period. The author, independent art historian Ashley Bassie, explains how Expressionist art led the way to a new, intense, evocative treatment of psychological, emotional and social themes in the early twentieth century. The book examines the developments of Expressionism and its key works, highlighting the often intensely subjective imagery and the aspirations and conflicts from which it emerged while focusing precisely on the artists of the movement.

Emil Nolde



“I was in the midst of beautiful, productive painting when this ban on painting and selling arrived,” Nolde recalled later. “The brush fell out of my hand.” Nolde continued to paint during the eight years of his ostracism from his home in Seebull. He called the more than 1,300 small-format watercolors and gouaches that he produced “unpainted pictures,” and wrote that “The small works on paper provided me with great pleasure personally and as a painter.” This book illustrates over 100 of these works-more than 50 of them for the first time-as well as selected oil paintings.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner



Ernst Ludwig Kirchner painted city life as a joyous, bustling pageant, a sophisticated swirl of desiring bodies and colorful urbanity, giving Germany an energetic iconography for the glory days of modernity. One of the four founders of Die Brucke (The Bridge), Kirchner drew on German Renaissance art to conjure expressive exaggerations of face and posture, and brought to landscape painting a city-dweller’s zest, imbuing tranquil scenery with riotous energy…

Emil Nolde



“I was in the midst of beautiful, productive painting when this ban on painting and selling arrived,” Nolde recalled later. “The brush fell out of my hand.” Nolde continued to paint during the eight years of his ostracism from his home in Seebull. He called the more than 1,300 small-format watercolors and gouaches that he produced “unpainted pictures,” and wrote that “The small works on paper provided me with great pleasure personally and as a painter.” This book illustrates over 100 of these works-more than 50 of them for the first time-as well as selected oil paintings.

Karl Schmidt-Rotluff



Presented in this volume is a dialog between the different artistic techniques used by Karl Schmidt-Rotluff - oil painting, watercolor, drawing and sculpture - complemented by examples from his personal collection of non-European objects of art, the motifs and influences of which he incorporated into his works.

Edvard Munch



Renowned for such powerful paintings as The Scream and Madonna, Munch continually reworked his monumental themes in the graphic arts. This publication brings together nearly sixty of Munch’s most important prints, from the National Gallery of Art and two exceptional private collections, demonstrating how the artist’s experimental impulses and virtuosic handling of intaglio, lithography, and woodcut over the course of his lifetime endowed his haunting motifs with new meanings.

What is Modern Art?

text-align:justify; For centuries artists enjoyed their place serving the Church, the aristocracy and current public conventions or tradition. Their handiwork decorated castles, stately homes and Churches with allegorical, mythological and religious subject matter. But towards the end of the 18th century things began to change. It was in fact the French Revolution of 1789 which caused the shift. The Modern era unfolded in its shadow. Under the mantra of liberty, equality and fraternity, society was irrevocably transformed. Art had become a subject like philosophy and was open to be discussed. Artists became self conscious and self reliant. They were no longer constrained by a preconceived style, subject matter or technique. They critically examined existing conventions and created new possibilities for art. From the late 18th century many artists and art movements arose which challenged traditional thinking about painting, It is widely believed that Modern Art began with the work of the Frenchman, Paul Cezanne. (1839 - 1906) . He built upon the new techniques developed by his predeccesors (like the Impressionists), and together with this tried to recapture a sense of order and clarity. His efforts opened the way for Cubism which reformed painting even more. Many more movements followed, all challenging and transforming the act of painting in their own way. By the late 1960's,and early 1970's artists began to experiment with new media, such as video and performance and moved away from painting. It is here then, where Modernism is said to have ended and a new era begun.

What is Contemporary Art?

text-align:justify; Contemporary art is simply the art created in our lifetime. The subject matter explored is considered to be the most socially conscious,of any previous era. And the techniques employed reflect everyday life. Artists use video, multimedia, nature, music and more, to express their ideas.

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